Paul-Henri Campbell
Paul-Henri Campell at the Leipzig Book Fair

“Literature imparts a sense of autonomy and intimacy upon us” – Interview with Paul-Henri Campbell

Thomas Koeplin Insights, Interview 0 Comments

We met Paul-Henri Campbell upon recommendation by his associate, the painter Aris Kalaizis. Campbell is a bilingual writer of German and English. In his essays and poetry, he often deals with modern mythologies. He has written poetry about, for instance, the Firebird Trans Am, New Yorkˈs A-Train, the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk, and the Concorde. We talked on an autumnally cool but sunny afternoon at a café in Frankfurt.

We talked to him about how he came to literature and what it means for him …

“Literature is unique among the arts.

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Gerald Hüther

Innovation is a new Combination of Things that have previously been separate – Interview with Neurobiologist Gerald Huether

Dirk Dobiéy Insights, Interview, News 0 Comments

Gerald Hüther is a neurobiologist and author. He studied biology in Leipzig and also received his doctorate there. In 1988, he qualified as a professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Göttingen and received the teaching license of Neurobiology. Professor Hüther has published a variety of books, most recently “Etwas mehr Hirn, bitte” (“A little more brainpower, please”), where he sums up his experience and insights into the topics of purpose, individual constructiveness and the love of joint creativity.

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Defy the Data and Act on Intuition: Interview with Tim Leberecht (Part 2)

Dirk Dobiéy Business, Insights, Interview, Organization 0 Comments

Note: This is the second part of an Interview with Tim Leberecht, Chief marketing officer of NBBJ and Author of The Business Romantic. Please access the first part here.

Dirk: Tim, in your book The Business Romantic you propose to not just use quantitative measures to deal with complexity. What other options do we have?

Tim: Complexity begins when quants end. The truly complex things are the ones we can’t comprehend, those outside of our grasp.

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