Salomé Voegelin

“We cannot teach a virtuosity of listening as a skill separate from the contingent moment of listening” – Interview with artist and researcher Salomé Voegelin

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Salomé Voegelin is a  widely interested artist, writer and researcher working in different modalities. Her professional work is mostly engaged in the world sound makes, socio-political and aesthetic thinking via the practice of listening. She is the author of three influential books on sound: The Political Possibility of Sound (2018), Sonic Possible Worlds (2014), and Listening to Noise and Silence (2010). Salomé is a Professor of Sound at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts London. 

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Jürgen Budday during a concert
Jürgen Budday during a performance

„Never give up and never lose hope“ – Interview with German conductor Jürgen Budday

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For Jürgen Budday, his artistic path began primarily through his own love for music. Above all, he wanted to do something that could also satisfy him personally. His becoming process was characterized by a dialectical development process: good mentoring on the one hand and persistence and his own discipline on the other.: „During my studies I got a very solid basis for making music and I am very grateful to all my teachers who brought me to a higher level.

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Elastic in Times of Crisis

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A NEW NORMAL 

Whether the situation is acute like SARS-CoV-2 or creeping like the climate catastrophe: what is perceived as a state of emergency can, today, be understood as a constant companion in different guises. “Uncertainty is the new normal,” explained IMF chief Kristalina Georgiewa in a recent interview with the German weekly magazine Der Spiegel. If she is correct in her assessment, we must fundamentally change our perspective on crises.

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Gaspard recording a loop in Kathmandu, Nepal with Ritesh

“Everyone has a different creativity” – Interview with entrepreneur and video-maker Gaspard Bonnefoy

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I first met entrepreneur and video-maker Gaspard Bonnefoy while we were finishing our master’s studies in Montpellier. Back then, I remember rushing off to find an internship in a big company that would provide me the opportunity to start my career. Gaspard, meanwhile, was turning down a permanent job offer from the company where he had completed an apprenticeship, and was planning to set off on an exciting quest to understand how culture influences musical creativity.

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“I don’t believe in inspiration. I believe in construction” – Interview with Painter Joël Renard

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When asked how he became an artist, Renard looked at us, slightly puzzled, before answering: “This is a difficult question. I don’t really know how we become artists”. After a short pause, he finally added: “All I know is that at some point in my life and studies, I studied in Beaux-Arts. Once there, I think that I have seen some workspaces, some thoughts where I realize that I belonged there. At least I think I meant to belong there.

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Charles Caleb Ward: His First Appearance in Public

The Abolition of Creativity: An Essay on Artificial and Artistic Intelligence (5/5)

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By Thomas Köplin and Dirk Dobiéy

The last part of our five-part series. Read the first part here, the second part here, the third part here, and the fourth part here.

Part 5: Ratio and resilience

A unique feature of artificial intelligence is that it knows no feeling. It works logically, although its logic is not always understandable for us humans.

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Music without a person: Virtuoso without having to practice?

The Abolition of Creativity: An Essay on Artificial and Artistic Intelligence (4/5)

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By Thomas Köplin and Dirk Dobiéy

The fourth part of our five-part series. Read the first part here, the second part here, and the third part here.

Part 4: Automation, Routine, and Play

Machines reduce our workload thanks to automation. They take on dangerous tasks, tasks that require precision, or tasks that bore us. The increasing efficiency or (if you will) intelligence of the systems makes it possible also to automate knowledge-intensive or complicated activities.

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Buddha-Shakyamuni seated in Meditation (Dhyanamudra)

The Abolition of Creativity: An Essay on Artificial and Artistic Intelligence (3/5)

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By Dirk Dobiey and Thomas Köplin

The third part of our five-part series. Read the first part here and the second part here.

Part 3: Decision and Self-Awareness

One of the benefits of artificial intelligence is that it helps us take decisions today (or more so in the future) or releases us from them altogether. This sounds sensible and tempting in the face of a real or perceived increasing variety of possibilities.

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Curiosity Rover: the artistic concept of NASA Science Laboratory for Mars

The Abolition of Creativity: An Essay on Artificial and Artistic Intelligence (2/5)

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By Dirk Dobiey and Thomas Köplin

The second part of our five-part series. Read the first part here.

Part 2: Efficiency and Variety

Technological progress is often equated with efficiency gains. For example, machines, especially those that get ascribed more and more certain intelligence, can often do things many times more efficiently than humans can. They relieve us of tasks and decisions and thus also reduce the wealth of personal experiences quite casually.

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